Find it fast Open

Student Services: Programs

Student Services Department

Student Services: Programs

Pre-School

PRESCHOOL PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS

The Integrated Preschool is an early childhood program that provides special education services to 3 and 4 year-old children who require specialized preschool program in order to make progress.  The program provides a high staff to student ratio (1:5) in order to closely support and teach young children with and without disabilities. The program honors each individual child’s rate of development and learning style.  It provides structured, explicit instruction focusing on communication, social, self-help, physical and cognitive development. Through a multidisciplinary approach (early childhood, special education, occupational and physical therapy, speech and language, and psychology) in close collaboration with parents and other caretakers, the Integrated Preschool meets the mandated special education needs of children.  The Integrated Preschool also provides a high quality early childhood education for tuitioned in Hopkinton students.
 
The Preschool Intensive Needs Program is for students with disabilities that require a specially designed program in order for them to learn effectively.  Students will focus on increasing their independent skills in all areas including academics, play skills, social, communication, self-care, motor and behavior management.  These skills are approached in a variety of settings to promote generalization of skills. The class provides a highly structured classroom environment utilizing behavior management systems, augmentative communication and assistive technology, and are supervised by the district BCBAs.  Grade level curriculum material may be modified and/or an alternative curriculum utilized based on assessment information such as the Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills (ABLLS). The program is staffed with Special Education Teacher and ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis) paraprofessionals. Each intensive class has one intensive special needs preschool teacher and three ABA paraprofessionals. Students attend a sub-separate classroom that further focuses on enhancing critical skill as outlined by IEPs .  In addition, students attend an integrated preschool class with typical peers 
 
The Hopkinton Integrated Preschool provides young learners with a safe and nurturing environment where they develop a love of learning and of school while increasing in independence, learning to work well with others, and developing effective communication skills.

Middle School

MIDDLE SCHOOL PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS

The program descriptions for the following services are based upon the premise that special education students spend at least a portion of their school day with their general education peers in the classroom. This document provides guidance in the placement of middle school students with disabilities into appropriate classes.

Inclusion Support (Grades 6-8)

Program:  Inclusion Support (Grades 6-8)
 
Student Profile:  
Special education students receiving inclusion support services have a broad range of disability patterns, including challenges to learning, behavioral and or social/emotional regulation and executive functioning.  These students benefit from specific strategy instruction and practice with generalization in the classroom. Students may experience weaknesses in a variety of domains related to learning, as measured by diagnostic testing, and may have a unique learning profile that requires inclusive support. 

 
Program Description:   
Inclusion support services provide a variety of targeted individualized and small group instruction in the regular education classroom. Students are supported academically and socially through classroom accommodations designed to support progress within the grade level curriculum.    These students may receive specially designed instruction for academic areas such as reading, written language, and mathematics or direct instruction in social skills, self-regulation skills and/or executive functioning skills. The goal is for these students to access the grade level curriculum. Additionally, these students may participate in a small group academic support period in grades seven and eight where specialized instruction takes place focusing on the areas or reading, writing, math, study skills, and organization dependent on IEP needs.  The academic support period takes the place of a foreign language class for seventh and eighth grade students. 
 
  • Staffing:  
    • Classroom teacher: plans/delivers instruction, arranges modifications and accommodations with support from the learning specialist 
    • Special education teacher: plan/provide specially designed instruction in the small group setting or in ELA or Math classes
    • Paraprofessional: provides students with accommodations and provides modifications as directed by the learning specialist/ classroom teacher
  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations
  • Programming: Range of instructional group sizes, including individualized instruction as needed, and specially designed instruction
  • Related Services:  Speech-language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, counseling, and other related services as needed provided in both in-class and pull-out settings.
 
Program Goals: 
The goal of the inclusion support program is to provide students with a variety of disabilities the academic, executive function, and self-regulation skills that they need to become successful independent learners in the general curriculum.  
 

Co-Taught Classes- ELA + Math (Grades 6-8)

Program: Co-Taught Classes- ELA + Math (Grades 6-8)
 
Student Profile:  
Special education students in the co-taught classes have a variety of disabilities related to learning.  They have challenges related to attaining and sustaining grade level skills such that they require multiple opportunities to learn, practice and apply remedial and compensatory strategies in order to make effective progress.  Students recommended for co-taught classes have below grade level skills in at least one significant academic domain, as measured by both diagnostic and curriculum based measures. While some students in co-taught classes have more than one area of weakness, the primary disability pattern for these students is in an area that relates specifically to acquisition of core academic skills.  Students in co-taught classes will access grade level curriculum standards with and without modifications. 
 
Program Description: 
 
Co-taught classes are staffed by a general education teacher and a special education teacher, who share responsibility for the delivery of the instructional program to all students in the class. The general educator and special educator are responsible for the planning, teaching and assessing of all students and both teachers work together to maximize student learning through differentiated instruction.  Specially designed instruction is incorporated into the design and delivery of the classroom curriculum and allows for reinforcement of remedial and compensatory strategies throughout the class. Additionally, these students may participate in a small group academic support period in grades seven and eight where specialized instruction takes place focusing on the areas or reading, writing, math, study skills, and organization dependent on IEP needs.  The academic support period takes the place of a foreign language class for seventh and eighth grade students. 
 
  • Staffing:  
    • General education teacher + special education teacher: Collaborate to plan/provide instruction, modifications, and accommodations
    • Special education teacher: plan/provide specially designed instruction in the small group setting or in ELA or Math classes
  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations and modifications as needed
  • Programming:  Range of instructional group sizes, including individualized instruction as needed, and specially designed instruction
  • Related Services:  Speech-language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, counseling, and other related services as needed provided in both in-class and pull-out settings.
 
Program Goals: 
The goal of the Co-taught classroom is to provide students with specific learning needs access to individualized instruction related to their IEP goals while allowing full participation in the general curriculum.  
 

Intensive Special Needs Program   (Grades 6-8)

Program: Intensive Special Needs Program   (Grades 6-8)
 
Student Profile:  
Students in the Intensive classrooms have significant disabilities such that they require a fully modified program or significant behavioral supports. These disabilities have a major impact on learning and include, but are not limited to, Autism Spectrum Disorder, intellectual disabilities, sensory disabilities, physical disabilities, social/emotional impairments, and multiple disabilities.  This program has the capacity to service students who need to increase their independent skills in all areas, including academics, social skills, communication, vocational, self-care, motor skills, and behavior management. Access to the general curriculum is provided by IEP goals that focus on standards related to core academic areas but typically do not reflect grade-level curriculum standards. Student may have all or some  programing in a self-contained environment. When students are included in academic classes, they are typically supported by paraprofessionals, as needed, who can assist the classroom teacher with accommodations and directed modifications. Some students in the Intensive Program will participate in the mandated state-wide testing program through the Alternative Assessment. Some students, based on their profile, will receive services until the age of 22.
 
The intensive program also may support students that require intensive behavioral supports who may be fully included across all academic classes. In some cases a behavior analyst helps generate relevant behavioral and social skill programming. These students will access grade level curriculum standards with and without accommodations and modifications.  
 
Program Description: 
The Intensive Programs provide an articulated approach to learning from sixth to eighth grade for student with significant needs. Services range from full inclusion, partial inclusion, and substantially separate instruction. The focus of the curriculum in the Intensive Program is both academic and functional, including basic skills as well as a variety of communication skills, social skills, self-regulation skills, and fine and gross motor skills as determined by student’s educational plans. These skills are approached in a variety of settings, including the general education classrooms, to promote generalization of skills. These classes provide a highly structured classroom environment utilizing behavior management systems, augmentative communication, and assistive technology as needed. 
  • Staffing:  
    • Special education teacher: plan/provide specially designed instruction for reading, math, ELA, life skills, and vocational skills occurring in the learning center; collaborates with general classroom teachers on modifications needed for students in inclusive settings
    • General education teacher: collaborate to plan/provide instruction, modifications, and accommodations for intensive students in inclusion settings
    • Paraprofessional: provides students with accommodations and provides modifications as directed by the learning specialist/ classroom teacher when supporting inclusion settings, may also provide academic, reading, or math support within the learning center
    • ABA Tech: provides students with accommodations and provides modifications as directed by the learning specialist/ classroom teacher when supporting inclusion settings, may also provide academic, reading, or math support within the learning center, run behavior intervention plans; provides discrete trial instruction 
    • Behavior analyst consultation: Provides behavior and social skills programming as well as consultation with the learning specialist; may also assist with academic programming in discrete trial formats. 
  • Curriculum:   Academic skills based focus with additional focus on communication and a variety of skills related to independent functioning.
  • Programming:  Small group and specialized individualized instruction, and/or discrete trial instruction as well as other instructional approaches. 
  • Typical Related Services:  Speech-language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, counseling, adaptive PE, assistive technologies, access to vision and hearing specialists as needed
 
Program Goals: 
The goal of intensive services is to provide students with targeted specially designed instruction to increase their functional independence as well as their academic progress.  
 

Language-Based Classes (Grades 6-8)

Program:  Language-Based Classes (Grades 6-8)
 
Student Profile:  
Special education students participating in language-based classes have a broad range of disability patterns, including challenges to learning, language processing and organization, communication, and executive functioning.  These students benefit from specific strategy instruction and practice with generalization across classroom settings. Students may experience weaknesses in a variety of domains related to learning (reading, writing, and/or math), as measured by diagnostic testing, and may have a unique learning profile that requires inclusive support in a language rich environment. These student are typically more than 1.5 to 2  years below grade level in literacy skills. Additionally, cohorts may vary depending on student profiles. 
 
Program Description:   
Language based classrooms provide a variety of targeted individualized and small group instruction. Students are supported academically and organizationally through classroom accommodations and modifications to access grade level curriculum provided by regular education and special education service providers.  In class support includes a broad range of strategies by both regular and special educators for targeted learning activities with set language-based approaches and strategies. The focus of Language Based courses includes academic areas such as reading, written language, mathematics as well as direct instruction in executive functioning skills. Generally, the goal is for these students to access the grade level curriculum; however, the pacing of this course may be reduced in order to provide a greater focus on key instructional standards with increased repetition in order to enhance learning outcomes for students needing greater focus on language acquisition. Additionally, grade seven and eight students may participate in a small group academic support period where specialized instruction takes place focusing on the areas or reading, writing, math, study skills, and organization dependent on IEP needs.  The academic support period takes the place of a foreign language class for seventh and eighth grade students. 
 
  • Staffing:  
    • General education teacher + Special education teacher: collaborate to plan/provide instruction, modifications, and accommodations
    • Paraprofessional: provides students with accommodations and provides modifications as directed by the learning specialist/ classroom teacher
  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations and modifications (as needed)
  • Programming:  Range of instructional group sizes, including individualized instruction as needed, and specially designed instruction
  • Related Services:  Speech-language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, counseling, and other related services as needed provided in both in-class and pull-out settings.
 
Program Goals: 
The goal of the Language Based courses is to provide students with a variety of disabilities the academic, executive function, and self-regulation skills that they need to become successful independent learners in the general curriculum. 

START Program (Student Therapeutic Academic Resource Team)

Student Profile/Referrals: 

The student therapeutic academic resource team typically supports students with mental health needs or health needs, often resulting in significant absenteeism . Students are referred by middle school administrators, school counselors, school adjustment counselors, school nurse, and the special education department. There will be an official intake meeting prior to a student joining START. All Hopkinton Middle School students are eligible, with or without an existing 504 or IEP. Additionally, students can be supported by START during a pre-referral and evaluation process. 

Program Description:

Hopkinton Middle School’s Student Therapeutic Academic Resource Team (START) is a short-term transitional program, the goal of which is to reintegrate students with significant absences back into school by providing clinical, skill-based, psychological, and academic support. START is designed to be a place where students can come to get support and gain skills that will increase their ability to function independently, transition back to school and succeed within the community. 

START is designed to be a transitional support (usually 6-12 weeks). It was created on the premise that a timely intervention after hospitalization, substance abuse treatment, or serious medical event might improve the student’s reentry and at the same time lessen chances of relapse. On a case-by-case basis, START may be considered as a preventative intervention. 

  • Staffing:  Licensed Mental Health Clinician, special education paraprofessional

  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations and modifications as needed

  • Programming:  Range of instructional group sizes, including individualized instruction as needed

Program Goals: The goal of the START Program is to support students both emotionally and academically while preventing the need for hospitalization or supporting the return from hospitalization. 

Empower Program

Student Profile/Referrals: 

The EMPOWER program typically supports students with social-emotional-behavioral needs often resulting in an interruption to their learning in the classroom. Students are referred by middle school administrators, school psychologist and counselors, team leaders, and learning specialists. There will be an official intake meeting prior to a student joining EMPOWER. All Hopkinton Middle School students are eligible, with or without an existing 504 or IEP. Additionally, students can be supported by EMPOWER during a pre-referral and intake evaluation process. 

Program Description: Hopkinton Middle School’s EMPOWER program is a long-term program, the goal of which is to provide social-emotional-behavioral support and academic assistance to students whose behaviors significantly interrupt their learning in the classroom. EMPOWER is designed to be a place where students can receive support and gain skills that will increase their ability to self-regulate and function successfully in the classroom and succeed within the school and community. 

  • Staffing: Learning Specialist, School Adjustment Counselor, School Psychologist

  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations and modifications as needed

  • Programming:  Range of instructional group sizes, including individualized instruction as needed

Program Goal: The goal of EMPOWER at Hopkinton Middle School is to provide social-emotional-behavioral support and academic assistance to students whose behaviors significantly interrupt their learning in the classroom.  EMPOWER provides students with the opportunity to learn self-regulation strategies based in restorative and mindful practices with the hope that, over time, students are able to self-regulate in the classroom with success.

High School

High School Program Descriptions

The program descriptions for the following services are based upon the premise that special education students spend at least a portion of their school day with their general education peers in the classroom. This document provides guidance in the placement of high school students with disabilities into appropriate classes. Services listed below are not exclusive; students may participate in more than one of the following supports based upon their individual needs.

Learning Center

Student Profile:
Students receiving academic support in this setting typically have disabilities related to basic academic skills, communication, and executive functioning. These students require specific strategy instruction and practice outside of the general education classroom.  Students may experience weaknesses in a variety of domains related to learning, as measured by diagnostic testing, and may have a unique learning profile that requires inclusive support. 

 
Program Description:
This service is in lieu of an elective or study period.  This learning center addresses students’ disability related needs in order for them to make progress on IEP goals and within the regular education curriculum. These students attend classes without support or with support in their area of need. They may participate in Inclusion Support, Co-taught, and possibly Foundations classes, all described below. Many students with language based learning disabilities will be supported in this center with a combination of other services based on individual needs. 
 
  • Staffing:  Special education teacher, special education paraprofessional
  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations and modifications as needed
  • Programming:  Range of instructional group sizes, including small group and  individualized instruction as needed, specially designed instruction
 
Program Goals:
The goal of the Learning Center is to remediate disability related needs through specialized instruction, related to IEP goals, to students with specific
learning needs while supporting full participation in the general education curriculum.  

Foundations Learning Center

Student Profile:
Students receiving academic support in this setting typically have disabilities which limit their use and acquisition of language as it relates to reading, writing, math, and communication. Students in this class have disabilities including  communication, reading, writing, math, health, and possibly with disabilities including neurological or autism. These students require specific strategy instruction and practice outside of the general education classroom. Students may experience weaknesses in a variety of domains related to learning, as measured by diagnostic testing, and may have a unique learning profile that requires inclusive support. These student exhibit significant struggles in college preparatory courses. Additionally they are typically significantly behind grade level and have historically scored in the Warning range on the MCAS. 
 
Program Description:
This service is in lieu of an elective or study period. This learning center uses language based strategies to support students across the curriculum by addressing  their disability related needs in order for them to make progress on IEP goals and within the regular education curriculum. Special focus is given to instructional pacing and volume.  These students primarily attend Foundations or Co-taught classes, both described below.  
 
  • Staffing:  Special education teacher, special education paraprofessional
  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations and modifications as needed
  • Programming:  Range of instructional group sizes, including small group and individualized instruction as needed, specially designed instruction
 
Program Goals:
The goal of the Foundations Learning Center is to remediate disability related needs through specialized instruction, related to IEP goals, to students with specific learning needs while supporting participation in the general education curriculum.
 

Social-Emotional Learning Center

Student Profile:
Students receiving academic support in this setting typically have disabilities including emotional and autism (high functioning) possibly with secondary disabilities in communication, health, reading, writing, math, and neurological.  These students require specific strategy instruction and practice outside of the general education classroom. Students may experience weaknesses in a variety of domains related to learning, as measured by diagnostic testing, and may have a unique learning profile that requires inclusive support. 

 
Program Description:
This service is in lieu of an elective or study period. These students typically receive regularly scheduled counseling support. This learning center addresses student's’ disability related needs in order for them to make progress on IEP goals and within the regular education curriculum. The center is continuously staffed in order to provide students a consistent support for social-emotional needs. These students may attend classes with or without support in their area of need. They may participate in Inclusion Support, Co-taught, and possibly Foundations classes, all described below. 
 
  • Staffing:  Special education teacher, special education paraprofessional
  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations and modifications as needed
  • Programming:  Range of instructional group sizes, including small group and individualized instruction as needed, specially designed instruction
 
Program Goals: 
The goal of the Social-Emotional Learning Center is to remediate disability related needs through specialized instruction, related to IEP goals, to students with social-emotional and learning needs, while supporting participation in the general education curriculum.

Inclusion Support - Within the General Education Setting

Student Profile:  
Special Education students receiving inclusion support services have a broad range of disability patterns, including challenges to learning, behavioral and or social/emotional regulation and executive functioning.  These students benefit from specific strategy instruction and practice with generalization in the classroom. Students may experience weaknesses in a variety of domains related to learning, as measured by diagnostic testing, and may have a unique learning profile that requires inclusive support. 
 
Program Description:   
Inclusion support services provide a variety of targeted individualized and small group instruction in the regular education classroom. Students are supported academically and socially through classroom accommodations designed to support progress within the grade level curriculum.   These students may receive specially designed instruction for academic areas such as reading, written language, and mathematics or direct instruction in social skills, self-regulation skills and/or executive functioning skills. The goal is for these students to access the grade level curriculum.
 
  • Staffing:  Classroom teacher, paraprofessional
  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations
  • Programming: Range of instructional group sizes, including small group and individualized instruction as needed, specially designed instruction
Program Goals: 
The goal of the inclusion support program is to provide students with a variety of disabilities the academic, executive function, and self-regulation skills that they need to become successful independent learners in the general curriculum.  

Co-Taught Classes - Within the General Education Setting

Student Profile:  
Special education students in the co-taught classes have a variety of disabilities related to learning.  They have challenges related to attaining and sustaining grade level skills such that they require multiple opportunities to learn, practice and apply remedial and compensatory strategies in order to make effective progress.  Students recommended for co-taught classes have below grade level skills in at least one significant academic domain, as measured by both diagnostic and curriculum based measures. While some students in co-taught classes have more than one area of weakness, the primary disability pattern for these students is in an area that relates specifically to acquisition of basic skills.  Students in co-taught classes will access grade level curriculum standards with and without modifications. 
 
Program Description: 
Co-taught classes are staffed by a general education teacher and a special education teacher, who share responsibility for the delivery of instruction to all students in the class. The general educator and special educator are responsible for the planning, teaching and assessing of all students, and both teachers work together to maximize student learning through differentiated instruction.  Specially designed instruction is incorporated into the design and delivery of the classroom curriculum and allows for reinforcement of remedial and compensatory strategies throughout the class.  
 
  • Staffing:  General education teacher, special education teacher
  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations and modifications as needed
  • Programming:  Range of instructional group sizes, including individualized instruction as needed, specially designed instruction
 
Program Goals:  The goal of the Co-taught classroom is to provide students with specific learning needs access to individualized instruction related to their IEP goals while allowing full participation in the general curriculum.  

Foundations Courses - Outside of the General Education Setting

Student Profile:  
Students participating in Foundations courses have a broad range of disability patterns, including challenges to learning, social/emotional regulation, communication, and executive functioning.  These students benefit from specific strategy instruction and practice with generalization in the classroom. Students may experience weaknesses in a variety of domains related to learning, as measured by diagnostic testing, and may have a unique learning profile that requires inclusive support. These student exhibit significant struggles in college preparatory courses. Additionally they are typically significantly behind grade level and have historically scored in the Warning range on the MCAS. 
 
Program Description:   
Foundations course services provide a variety of targeted individualized and small group instruction. Students are supported academically and socially/emotionally through classroom accommodations and modifications to the grade level curriculum provided regular education and special education service providers.  In class support includes a broad range of strategies by both regular and special educators for targeted learning activities. The focus of Foundations courses includes academic areas such as reading, written language, mathematics as well as direct instruction in executive functioning skills. Generally, the goal is for these students to access the grade level curriculum.
 
  • Staffing:  Classroom teacher, special education teacher
  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum and/or modified core curriculum, and accommodations
  • Programming:  Range of instructional group sizes, including individualized instruction as needed, specially designed instruction
 
Program Goals: 
The goal of the Foundations courses is to provide students with a variety of disabilities the academic, executive function,  and self-regulation skills that they need to become successful independent learners in the general curriculum. Provided in a pull-out setting, the focus of the instruction is on generalizing skills and strategies to the classroom.

Intensive Special Needs Program - Outside of the General Education Setting

Student Profile:  
Students in the Intensive classrooms have significant disabilities such that they require a fully modified program.  These disabilities have a major impact on learning and include, but are not limited to, Autism Spectrum Disorder, intellectual disabilities, sensory disabilities, and physical disabilities.  This program is for students who need to increase their independent skills in all areas, including academics, social skills, communication, vocational, self-care, motor skills and behavior management. Access to the general curriculum is provided by IEP goals that focus on standards related to core academic areas but typically do not reflect grade level curriculum standards.  Most students in the Intensive Program will participate in the mandated state-wide testing program through the MCAS Alternative Assessment. Some of these students, based upon disability related needs,, will receive services until the age of 22.
 
Program Description: 
The Intensive Program provides an articulated approach to learning from grade nine through age 22 for students with significant needs. The focus of the curriculum in the Intensive Program is both academic and functional, including basic skills as well as a variety of communication skills, social skills, self-regulation skills, vocational skills, independent living skills, and fine and gross motor skills. These skills are approached in a variety of settings, including the general education classrooms, to promote generalization of skills. These classes provide a highly structured classroom environment utilizing behavior management systems, augmentative communication, and assistive technology. 
 
  • Staffing:  Special education teacher, paraprofessional staff, BCBA consultation
  • Curriculum:   Academic skills based focus with additional focus on communication and a variety of skills related to independent functioning.
  • Programming:  Small group and specialized individualized instruction, and/or discrete trial instruction as well as other instructional approaches. 
  • Typical Related Services:  Speech-language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, counseling, adaptive PE, assistive technologies, access to vision and hearing specialists as needed
Program Goals: 
The goal of Intensive services is to provide students with targeted instruction designed to increase their functional independence as well as their academic progress.  

18-22 EXCEL Program

Student Profile: 
Students in the EXCEL Program have not, and may not, earn a diploma. They have significant disabilities such that they require a fully modified program.  These disabilities have a major impact on learning and include, but are not limited to, Autism Spectrum Disorder, intellectual disabilities, sensory disabilities, and physical disabilities.  This program is for students who need to increase their independent skills in transitional areas, including vocational, social skills, independent living skills, communication, and self-care. IEP goals for these students focus on transition from secondary education.  Most students in the EXCEL Program will qualify for services through adult agencies beyond their 22nd birthday.
 
Program Description: 
The Intensive Programs provide an articulated approach to learning from grade nine through age 22 for students with significant needs. The focus of the curriculum in the Intensive Program is both academic and functional, including basic skills as well as a variety of communication skills, social skills, self-regulation skills, and fine and gross motor skills. These skills are approached in a variety of settings, including the general education classrooms, to promote generalization of skills. These classes provide a highly structured classroom environment utilizing behavior management systems, augmentative communication and assistive technology. 
 
  • Staffing:  Special education teacher, paraprofessional job coaches
  • Curriculum:   Skills based focus with additional focus on vocation, community, communication and a variety of skills related to independent functioning.
  • Programming:  Small group and specialized individualized instruction, and/or discrete trial instruction as well as other instructional approaches. 
  • Typical Related Services:  Speech-language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, counseling, adaptive PE, assistive technologies, access to vision and hearing specialists as needed
 
Program Goals: 
The goal of the EXCEL Program is to remediate disability related needs with a primary focus on the independent functioning skills necessary for Post-Secondary Transition. 

START Program (Student Therapeutic Academic Resource Team)

Student Profile/Referrals: 
The Student Therapeutic Academic Resource Team Program typically supports students with mental health or health needs, often resulting in significant absences.  Students are referred by high school administrators, school counselors, school adjustment counselors, school nurse, and the special education department. There is an official intake meeting prior to a student joining START. All Hopkinton High School students are eligible, with or without an existing 504 or IEP. Additionally, students can be supported by START during a pre-referral and evaluation process. 
 
Program Description:
Hopkinton High School’s Student Therapeutic Academic Resource Team (START) is a short-term transitional program, the goal of which is to reintegrate students with significant absences back into school by providing clinical, skill-based, psychological, and academic support. START is designed to be a place where students can come to get support and gain skills that will increase their ability to function independently, transition back to school and succeed within the community. 
 
START is designed to be a transitional support (usually 3-12 weeks). It was created on the premise that a timely intervention after hospitalization, substance abuse treatment, or serious medical event might improve the student’s reentry and at the same time lessen chances of relapse. On a case-by-case basis, START may be considered as a preventative intervention.
 
  • Staffing:  Licensed Mental Health Clinician, special education paraprofessional
  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations and modifications as needed
  • Programming:  Range of instructional group sizes, including individualized instruction as needed
 
Program Goals: 
The goal of the START Program is to support students both emotionally and academically while preventing the need for hospitalization or supporting the return from hospitalization.

Elementary

Elementary Program Descriptions
 
The program descriptions for the following three programs are based upon the premise that special education students spend at least a portion of their school day with their general education peers in the classroom. This document provides guidance in the placement of elementary students with disabilities into appropriate programs. 

Elementary Inclusion Support Program (ISP)

Program: Elementary Inclusion Support Program (ISP)
Schools:  Marathon, Elmwood, Hopkins
Grades:    Kindergarten-Grade 5
 
Student Profile:  
Students receiving inclusion support services have a broad range of disability patterns, including challenges to learning, behavioral and/or social regulation and executive functioning.  These students benefit from specific strategy instruction and practice with generalization in the classroom. Students may experience weaknesses in a variety of domains related to learning, as measured by diagnostic testing, and may have a unique learning profile that requires inclusive support. 
 
Program Description:   
Inclusion support services provide a variety of targeted individualized and small group instruction in both classroom and pull-out settings. Students are supported academically and socially through classroom accommodations and modifications to the grade level curriculum provided either in-class or in a pull-out setting by special education service providers.  A broad range of services, including in-class support by a paraprofessional for targeted learning activities, are available to students in the Inclusion Support Program. These students may receive specially designed instruction for academic areas such as reading, written language, and mathematics or direct instruction in social skills, self-regulation skills and/or executive functioning skills. Generally, the goal is for these students to access the grade level curriculum.
  • Staffing:  Classroom teacher, special education teacher, specialist, paraprofessional
  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations and modifications as needed
  • Programming:  Range of instructional group sizes, including individualized instruction as needed, specially designed instruction
  • Related Services:  Speech-language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, counseling, adaptive PE, and other related services as needed provided in both in-class and pull-out settings.
Program Goals: 
 
The goal of the inclusion support program is to provide students with a variety of disabilities the academic, executive function,  and self-regulation skills that they need to become successful independent learners in the general curriculum. Whether the services are provided in-class or in a pull-out setting, the focus of the instruction is on generalizing skills and strategies to the classroom.

Elementary Co-Taught Program  (CP)

Program:  Elementary Co-Taught Program  (CP)
Schools: Marathon, Elmwood, Hopkins
Grades:  Grade 1- Grade 5
 
Student Profile:  
Students in the co-taught classes have a variety of disabilities related to learning.  They have challenges related to attaining and sustaining grade level skills in numeracy and literacy, such that they require multiple opportunities to learn, practice and apply remedial and compensatory strategies throughout the day in order to make effective progress.  Students recommended for co-taught classes have below grade level skills in at least one significant academic domain, as measured by both diagnostic and curriculum based measures. While some students in co-taught classes have more than one area of weakness, the primary disability pattern for these students is in an area that relates specifically to acquisition of basic skills, including, but not limited to, specific learning disabilities and communication disabilities.  Students in co-taught classes will access grade level curriculum standards with modifications. In addition to academic needs, behavioral needs are taken into account when making placement decisions.
 
Program Description: 
Co-taught classes are staffed by a general education teacher and a special education teacher, who share responsibility for the delivery of the instructional program to all students in the class. The general educator and special educator are equally responsible for the planning, teaching and assessing of all students, and both teachers work together to maximize student learning through differentiated instruction.  Specially designed instruction is incorporated into the design and delivery of the classroom curriculum and allows for reinforcement of remedial and compensatory strategies throughout the day and across curriculum areas. Additional services, such as related therapies, are provided either in-class or in pull-out settings (on a limited basis).
  • Staffing:  General education teacher, special education teacher, specialists, paraprofessionals as needed.
  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations and modifications as needed
  • Programming:  Range of instructional group sizes, including individualized instruction as needed, specially designed instruction
  • Related Services:  Speech-language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, counseling, adaptive PE, other related services as needed, provided both in-class and pull-out settings on a limited basis.
Program Goals: 
The goal of the Co-taught Program is to provide students with specific learning needs access to individualized instruction related to their IEP goals while allowing full participation in the general curriculum.  

Elementary Intensive Program  (IP)

Program:   Elementary Intensive Program  (IP)
Schools: Marathon, Elmwood, Hopkins
Grades:  Kindergarten – Grade 5
 
Student Profile:  
Students in the Intensive classrooms have significant disabilities such that they require a fully modified program.  These disabilities have a major impact on learning and include, but are not limited to, Autism Spectrum Disorder, intellectual disabilities, sensory disabilities, physical disabilities and multiple handicaps.  This program is for students who need to increase their independent skills in all areas, including academics, social skills, communication, self-care, motor skills and behavior management. Access to the general curriculum is provided by IEP goals that focus on standards related to core academic areas but typically do not reflect grade level curriculum standards.  Most students in the Intensive Program will often participate in the mandated state-wide testing program through the Alternative Assessment.
 
Program Description: 
The Intensive Programs provide an articulated approach to learning from kindergarten through grade five for student with significant needs. The focus of the curriculum in the Intensive Program is both academic and functional, including basic skills as well as a variety of communication skills, social skills, self-regulation skills, and fine and gross motor skills. These skills are approached in a variety of settings, including the general education classrooms, to promote generalization of skills. These classes provide a highly structured classroom environment utilizing behavior management systems, augmentative communication and assistive technology. 
  • Staffing: Special education teacher, paraprofessional staff, BCBA consultation
  • Curriculum:   Academic  skills based focus with additional emphasis on communication and a variety of skills related to independent functioning.
  • Programming:  Small group and specialized individualized instruction, and/or discrete trial instruction as well as other instructional approaches. 
  • Typical Related Services:  Speech-language therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, counseling, adaptive PE, assistive technologies, access to vision and hearing specialists as needed
 
Program Goals: 
The goal of the Intensive Program is to provide students with targeted instruction designed to increase their functional independence as well as their academic progress. 

Additional Services

Hopkinton provides the following special services to all eligible students at all schools:
 
  • School Psychologists
  • Speech and Language Therapists
  • Occupational Therapists
  • Physical Therapists
  • Behavior Specialists 
 
  • Staffing:  Includes but is not limited to; School Psychologist, Adjustment Counselor, Speech and Language Therapist, Occupational Therapist, Physical Therapist, Teacher of the Visually Impaired, and Behavioral Therapist
  • Curriculum:  Core curriculum with accommodations and modifications as needed
  • Programming:  Typically small group and individualized instruction, however, some related services may be provided in the regular education environment, specially designed instruction
 
Program Goals:
The goal of related services is to remediate specific disability related needs in order to promote future independent functioning. 
 
Counseling Services and Behavior Management Consultations
 
All Hopkinton Schools offer counseling services either through the Psychologist, Guidance or Adjustment Counselors.  Social skills groups are available for students who require direct instruction in social enrichment skills. Individual counseling is utilized for students who show specific difficulties pertaining to the school environment and Behavior specialists are available in the system for consultation with teachers and parents as well as providing direct support to students.


 
Collaborative Programs / Approved Private Day Schools
 
The district belongs to the ACCEPT and TEC Collaboratives.  Hopkinton sends some students to specialized programs within the collaboratives.  The district also utilizes approved private school placements as is necessary for student whose needs cannot be met in district programs.


 
Consult Services
 
Outside consultation services are also provided by The Learning Center for the Deaf, The Carroll School for the Blind, Cotting School, Landmark and other consultants as needed.  These consultants may work directly with students and or provide training and support for all staff in planning, instructing and accommodating for students.

Search

Student Services

1 2 3 14 > showing 1 - 10 of 131 constituents

Rene Amershek

Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Student Services

Judith Anderson

Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Student Services

Susan Atwood

Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Student Services

Carly Audet

Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Student Services

Jessica Bacon

Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Student Services

Carolyn Balinskas

Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Student Services

Teresa Ballan

Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Student Services

Anu Bhogoju

Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Student Services

Jane Bisaillon

Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Student Services

Rebecca Black

Roles: Faculty & Staff
Departments: Student Services